Cut Your Goal in Half

When it comes to goals, if I'm honest, I'm pretty impatient. 

I doubt that's too unusual. Given that most people quit on their new year's resolutions and really most normal goals, too, I'm guessing I'm not that much of an odd duck (in general, sure, but just not in this area...). Most of us love starting a new goal but quickly grow impatient with how long it takes to actually finish it, and so we quit. 

As I read Chapter 2 of Finish, I was pleasantly surprised by Jon Acuff's simple advice: Cut your goal in half. 

https://www.mikegroesser.com/blog/iterative-goals

'Tis but a scratch

'Tis but a scratch

Remember the Black Knight scene from Monty Python and the Holy Grail? King Arthur gets in a sword fight with the Black Knight, which sounds serious... until you watch it and see the gag comedy in it all as King Arthur chops him down (literally) one limb at a time. After King Arthur lops off his left arm he says "I've had worse!" and "'Tis but a scratch!" I crack up every time as he continues to minimize his wounds and tries to keep fighting. 

This is going to sound really weird, but I think about this scene when I think about adaptability.

https://www.mikegroesser.com/blog/tis-but-a-scratch

Risk loves company

Risk loves company

As I continued reading Finish by Jon Acuff, I had a lightbulb moment where I connected his points about perfectionism with some insights on risk-taking I learned about in Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman. 

Kahneman explains that CEOs and other business leaders encourage risk-taking because they know that risk is necessary for higher returns and they're OK spreading it among their teams. The individual business leaders under them, on the other hand, are risk averse because failing as an individual feels like complete failure. So, their interests are opposed -- the CEO wants risk and is OK if a few of the leaders fail while taking risks, but the leaders avoid risk because they don't want to be the dummy who messed up. 

https://www.mikegroesser.com/blog/risk-loves-company

Why I chose to cheat on my iPhone

Why I chose to cheat on my iPhone

Is it weird that I feel like I'm doing something scandalous?

I guess that's the power of Apple's marketing machine. I recently switched to a Pixel 2 XL, and I can't shake the feeling that I'm doing something dangerous or immoral. It's like one day someone is going to see my new phone and I'll have to make up some crazy story about how I found it on the street and adopted it out of pity like a stray dog. 

But the real reason is I got sick of Apple's crap.

https://www.mikegroesser.com/blog/bye-bye-iphone-hello-pixel

An unexpected foe

An unexpected foe

I have never considered myself a perfectionist. 

In fact, I always thought of myself as near the opposite -- failing to stick with things long enough to give them polish or even finish them at all. 

But right now I'm reading Finish by Jon Acuff, and it's challenging my understanding of perfectionism.

https://www.mikegroesser.com/blog/an-unexpected-foe